Host Fungal Interfaces

A significant proportion of all human microbial infections involve biofilms, surface-associated microbial communities encased in extracellular matrix and highly resistant to antibiotic treatment, and Candida spp. are no exception (Kojic and Daroviche, Clin Microbiol Rev 2004). Candida spp. biofilms are the third leading cause of catheter-related infections, with Candida albicans being responsible for over 50% of the cases. Other manifestations, such as oropharyngeal candidiasis, denture stomatitis and vaginal candidiasis, are also frequently associated with C. albicans biofilm growth. Treatment of such infections is frequently challenging due to high resistance to conventional antifungal therapy. 

The Host Fungal Interfaces group focuses on identifying the mechanisms and the processes involved in Candida spp. biofilm development and persistence. Specifically, we aim to understand the mechanism of pH modulation by Candida spp. in response to metabolic changes and the effect of this phenomenon on biofilm formation. 

We want to investigate whether and how environmental neutralization by the fungal pathogen Candida albicans contributes to biofilm formation and virulence.

We want to investigate whether and how environmental neutralization by the fungal pathogen Candida albicans contributes to biofilm formation and virulence.